2014-15 Catalog

General Education Program

General education is the common educational experience for all undergraduates at UW-L. It is uniquely concerned with the broad education of the whole person and plays a vital role in preparing students for life beyond the university.

The primary purpose of general education is to cultivate knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential for independent learning and thinking. As a result of general education, students will be more knowledgeable in a wide variety of subject matter areas; and also better able and more willing to ask significant questions, seek appropriate solutions to complex problems, make sound judgments and formulate rational beliefs.

To these ends, the goals of the General Education Program at UW-L are to develop:

  • Communication skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening
  • Skills in analytical, logical and critical thinking in various branches of knowledge accomplished in part by each student completing at least one mathematics course
  • Oral and written communications skills in a second language for students who elect to do so
  • Knowledge of the development and interaction of human cultures
  • Understanding of concepts, ideas, and systems of thought that underlie human activities
  • Understanding of and sensitivity to cultural diversity in the United States
  • Understanding of the social, political, and economic frameworks of societies within the global context
  • Understanding and appreciation of the arts
  • Understanding of nature, including the role of science and technology in environmental and social change
  • Knowledge and skills essential to physical well-being and a healthy lifestyle

The General Education Program places special emphasis on helping students to become more intellectually skilled through inquiry-based teaching and learning. Inquiry-based general education engages students actively in learning and thinking about essential knowledge, issues, and questions. Each general education course enhances students’ intellectual growth in some way. As students gain knowledge, they also learn to use knowledge more effectively, to ask and answer questions, solve problems, develop ideas, and make sound judgments.

The UW-La Crosse General Education Program consists of two major components: Skills and Liberal Studies. Skills courses improve students’ abilities to learn, think, and communicate effectively. Liberal studies courses engage students in the study of important areas of knowledge and experience and focus on central questions, issues, and problems we share as people and as members of the same society.

General Education Committee

The General Education Committee is responsible for coordination, review, and assessment of the general education curriculum. Membership of the committee consists of nine faculty, with proportional representation from the colleges and one student. The provost, registrar, and deans of each college serve as administrative consultants.


General education requirements

  1. Students must earn a minimum of 48 credits of general education courses.
  2. Students must earn the minimum credits within each category (totaling 39 credits).
  3. Students earn the remaining credits from any combination of categories.
  4. All students must complete the literacy requirements (ENG 110 or ENG 112, and CST 110) and a general education mathematics course prior to earning 60 university credits.

Skills

Fundamental skills are those central to learning, analyzing, evaluating, integrating, and communicating information and knowledge. These skills are essential in all fields of study and their development should be enhanced and refined throughout the college years.

(Proficiency tests are available in "Skills" courses. Contact appropriate department for information.)

Literacy: tools for skilled communication (GE 01)

(Must be completed prior to earning 60 credits.)

Reading, writing, speaking, and listening are the tools by which a person becomes educated. General education skills courses improve students’ abilities to read, write, speak, and listen with clarity, precision, and depth of understanding. Courses in this area include composition and oral communication. In addition, the program includes writing emphasis courses which enhance students’ abilities to communicate and learn through writing.

CST 110Communicating Effectively3
ENG 110College Writing I3
or ENG 112 College Writing AP (Advanced Placement)

Students receiving less than a grade of "C" in CST 110, ENG 110 or ENG 112 must repeat the course.

Writing emphasis courses (two courses required)

All students must either complete two writing emphasis courses or complete a major that has a writing-in-the-major program. If completing two courses, they must be at the 200 level or above, one of which must be at the 300 level or above. One course must be in the major (not core). See the class timetable for information on offerings each semester.

The following departments/majors have writing-in-the-major programs: art, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, clinical lab science, communication studies, computer science, educational studies, English: rhetoric and writing emphasis, English: literature emphasis, exercise and sport science, health education/health promotion, mathematics, microbiology, modern languages, occupational therapy, psychology, radiation therapy, recreation management/therapeutic recreation, sociology/archaeology, STEP EA-A majors (biology education, chemistry education, physics education, general science education, computer science education, mathematics education, English education, geography education, history education, political science education, sociology education, and general social studies education), and theatre arts. They incorporate writing requirements across their curriculum rather than identifying specific classes as writing emphasis classes. Students with majors in these departments will fulfill their writing emphasis requirement by completing that major. Transfer students who transfer courses from another institution that are applicable to the major should consult the department about fulfillment of the writing emphasis requirement.

Writing emphasis courses do not count toward the 48 credit general education requirement unless identified in one of the general education categories.

Mathematical/Logical systems and modern languages: tools for structured analysis and communication (GE 02)

(At least one math course must be completed prior to earning 60 credits.)

General education enhances students’ abilities to think, reason, and solve problems with precision and clarity. Study in this area helps students to understand that words and symbols can have exact definitions and usage, that analyses of some problems require strict use of structured rules, and that discoveries, results, and ideas must be communicated clearly to others who may be unfamiliar with such rules or language. This area of study includes courses in mathematics, computer science, logic, and foreign languages. Although these fields differ in many respects, each emphasizes the skilled use of symbols or language to analyze, evaluate, or communicate more effectively.

Minimum of seven credits required, which must include at least one math course. Non-native speakers of English may use one math course and an acceptable score on a test of English proficiency/placement exam to meet the mathematical/logical systems and modern languages requirement.1

Mathematics
At least one course required - minimum three credits; not both MTH 150 and MTH 151; not both MTH 175 and MTH 207.
MTH 135Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I4
MTH 136Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II4
MTH 145Elementary Statistics4
MTH 150College Algebra4
or MTH 151 Precalculus
MTH 175Applied Calculus4
or MTH 207 Calculus I
MTH 208Calculus II4
MTH 265Mathematical Models in Biology4
Languages and other logical systems 1
CHI 102Elementary Chinese II4
CHI 201Intermediate Chinese I4
CHI 202Intermediate Chinese II4
FRE 102Elementary French II4
FRE 201Intermediate French I3
FRE 202Intermediate French II4
GER 102Elementary German II4
GER 201Intermediate German I4
GER 202Intermediate German II4
RUS 102Elementary Russian II4
RUS 201Intermediate Russian I4
RUS 202Intermediate Russian II4
SPA 102Elementary Spanish II4
SPA 103Elementary Spanish I and II4
SPA 201Intermediate Spanish I4
SPA 202Intermediate Spanish II4
MLG 102World Languages: Elementary II4
MLG 201World Languages: Intermediate I4
MLG 202World Languages: Intermediate II4
MLG 204Heritage Language: Intermediate4
ESL 250ESL Speaking 14
ESL 251U.S. Culture and Film 14
ESL 252ESL Writing/Grammar 14
ESL 253ESL Research paper 14
CS 101Introduction to Computing4
CS 120Software Design I4
CT 100Introduction to Computational Thinking3
PHL 101Introduction to Logic3
1

Non-native speakers of English may satisfy the modern language option by exhibiting proficiency (a score of 70 or above) on the La Crosse Battery of Exams for non-native speakers of English or by earning a score on the TOEFL or IELTS that results in admission to UW-L as a degree seeking student (contact the English as a Second Language Institute for eligibility and regulations). None of these exams provide college credit but will suffice to satisfy Languages and Other Logical Systems requirements above. Students utilizing the exam option will still need to complete a minimum of 48 credits applicable to the general education program. Students in the English as a Second Language (ESL) program may satisfy modern language option (Languages and Other Logical Systems) by completing ESL 252 or ESL 253 and one additional course from ESL 250, ESL 251, ESL 252, ESL 253 (maximum of four credits from these courses applicable to general education).


Non-native speakers should NOT enroll in a 101, 102, 201, or 202 level course taught in their native language. Native English speakers are not eligible to enroll in ESL 250, ESL 251, ESL 252, or ESL 253

Liberal Studies

The "Liberal Studies" component of general education engages students in the study of major areas of knowledge and experience. Liberal studies courses afford opportunities for students to evaluate critically their heritage and see beyond the boundaries of their culture, to think scientifically in both the natural and social spheres, to explore texts thoroughly and imaginatively, to respond sensitively to the expressive arts, and to plan a life which makes the best possible use of work and leisure time. The thematic categories and inquiry-based teaching and learning in liberal studies courses help students to see connections among fields of knowledge and to understand different perspectives and ways of thinking about important questions.

Minority cultures or multiracial women's studies (GE 03)

An essential goal of general education is to improve students’ understanding of and sensitivity to cultural diversity in the United States. All students take at least one course that focuses on minority cultures in the United States or women in the United States from a multiracial perspective. All courses in this category fulfill the UW System ethnic studies (ES) requirement.

Minimum of three credits required.

ECO 336Women in the U.S. Economy (ES)3
EFN 205Understanding Human Differences (ES)3
ENG/ERS 207Multicultural Literature of the United States (ES)3
ENG/ERS 210Literature of Black America (ES)3
ENG/ERS 215African American Authors (ES)3
ERS 100Introduction to Ethnic and Racial Studies (ES)3
HIS 306History of Ethnic America (ES)3
HIS 336Hispanics in the United States (ES)3
MUS 209History of Jazz Culture (ES)3
PHL 335Multicultural Philosophy in the United States (ES)3
POL 205Women and Politics (ES)3
PSY 285Culture and Mental Health: An Applied Perspective (ES)3
PSY 318Psychology of Women (ES)3
SAH 307Changing the Culture, Women in Science (ES)3
SOC 225Racial and Ethnic Minorities (ES)3
WGS 100Gender, Race and Class in American Institutions (ES)3
WGS 210Women's Voices / Women's Culture (ES)3
WGS 230Women's Diversity: Race, Class, and Culture (ES)3

International and multicultural studies: becoming world citizens (GE 04)

Knowledge about the variety of human experience is an integral part of liberal education. Moreover, the international dimensions of politics, commerce, economics, and culture touch our lives every day. We live in an interdependent world in which understanding of other cultures and societies is essential. These general education courses include world history and global studies courses that focus on the peoples, cultures, and societies of the world. Some courses in this category fulfill the UW System ethnic studies (ES) requirement.

Minimum of six credits required.

World history (one course required)
HIS 101Global Origins of the Modern World3
or HIS 102 Global Transition and Change
Global and multicultural studies (one course required)
ANT/ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC 202Contemporary Global Issues3
ART 301World Art3
CHI 320Introduction to Chinese Civilization3
ECO 120Global Macroeconomics3
ENG 208International Studies in Literature3
ENV 201Introduction to Environmental Studies3
FRE 220France and the Francophone World3
GEO 110World Cultural Regions3
GEO 200Conservation of Global Environments3
HIS 101Global Origins of the Modern World (which ever was not taken from world history list above)3
or HIS 102 Global Transition and Change
INS 250
  & INS 251
  & INS 252
Orientation to Study Abroad
   and Study Abroad Practicum: Journaling
   and Cross-Cultural Reentry From Study Abroad (must complete all 3 INS courses to count)
3
MIC 130Global Impact of Infectious Disease3
MLG 304Heritage Language: Advanced4
MUS 201Musical Cultures3
MUS 204Latin American Music: Its Context and Impact3
PHL 336International Multicultural Philosophy3
PHY 142Navigating Global Nuclear Issues3
POL 234Comparative Political Systems3
PSY 282Cross-Cultural Psychology3
THA 351World Theatre3

Science: understanding the natural world (GE 05)

As the health and prosperity of our society becomes more dependent on science and technology, our future becomes increasingly dependent upon a scientifically literate population. Individuals in our society must be sufficiently knowledgeable about scientific facts and applications to make skilled decisions concerning their use in addressing society’s problems. Courses in this area include the study of basic scientific knowledge, the role of applied science and technology as agents of change in society, and a laboratory component to develop an understanding of scientific inquiry.

Minimum of four credits required; one course must be a natural laboratory science from below.

Natural laboratory science
ANT 102Introduction to Physical Anthropology4
BIO 103Introductory Biology4
or BIO 105 General Biology
CHM 100Contemporary Chemistry4
CHM 103General Chemistry I5
ESC 101Earth Environments4
MIC 100Microbes and Society4
PHY 103Fundamental Physics I4
PHY 106Physical Science for Educators4
PHY 125Physics for the Life Sciences4
AST/PHY 155Solar System Astronomy4
AST/PHY 160Stars, Galaxies and the Universe4
PHY 203General Physics I4
Science, technology and society: emphasizing the role of applied science and technology as agents of change in society
BIO 102Contemporary Issues in Biological Sciences3
ESC 211Global Warming and Climate Change3

Self and society: understanding oneself and the social world (GE 06)

Each person, although unique, lives in a social world that exerts profound influence upon his or her attitudes, values, and behavior. It is important to gain a sound understanding of oneself in relation to others and an understanding of the social institutions that people create and which serve to influence our lives. Courses in this area focus on the study of human behavior and social institutions.

Minimum of three credits required.

ANT 101Human Nature/Human Culture3
ARC 100Archaeology: Discovering Our Past3
ART 302Visual Language in the Global Classroom3
CHE 200Public Health for the Educated Citizen3
CST 271Contemporary Media in Everyday Life3
ECO 110Microeconomics and Public Policy3
ECO/THA 376Economics of Art and Entertainment3
ENG 220Women and Popular Culture3
ERS 220Ethnic and Racial Stereotyping in the Media3
FIN 207Personal Finance3
GEO 102Maps and Society3
GER 398German Thinkers and Popular Culture3
POL 101American National Government3
POL 102State and Local Government3
PSY 100General Psychology3
SOC 110The Social World3
SOC 120Social Problems3
THA 130Multicultural U.S. Plays: Acting the Text3
UWL 100First Year Student Seminar1

Humanistic studies: the search for values and meaning (GE 07)

Academic study of the humanities involves the study of language as a medium for recording human experience and the major forms of such records: philosophical, historical, and literary. Students have the opportunity to test specialized knowledge and personal experience of humanity. These courses focus on what it means to be human, and what was, is, and should be valued by human beings.

Minimum of three credits required; one course must be a literature course from the literature category.

Literature
CHI 305Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature3
ENG 200Literature and Human Experience3
ENG 201American Literature I3
ENG 202American Literature II3
ENG 203English Literature I3
ENG 204English Literature II3
ENG 205Western Literature I3
ENG 206Western Literature II3
GER 399German Literature in Translation3
MLG 299Foreign Literature in Translation3
RUS 305Golden Age Russian Literature and Culture3
Other humanities
HIS 205History of Ethical Values in World Religions3
PHL 100Introduction to Philosophy3
PHL 200Introduction to the Literature of Philosophy3
POL 251Justice, Power, and Politics3

Arts: the aesthetic experience (GE 08)

The arts represent a fusion of the emotional, spiritual, and intellectual realities of the human condition. Study of the arts leads to heightened aesthetic experiences and deepens cultural understanding. This includes courses that focus on understanding, appreciating, and experiencing the fine and performing arts.

Minimum of two courses required from different departments.

ART 102Art Appreciation2
ART 160General Art Foundations3
ART 172Photography Survey3
ESS 104Dance Appreciation2
MUS 105Music Appreciation2
or MUS 110 The Listening Experience in Music
MUS 317Musical Classroom3
PHL 332Philosophy of the Arts3
THA 110Theatre Appreciation2
THA 120Acting for Non-Majors3
THA 201Dramatic Literature and Theatre Arts3

Health and physical well-being: learning to create healthy lives (GE 09)

The miracles of modern medicine exist side by side with many kinds of limiting physical conditions such as heart disease and obesity. Many health problems could be prevented or ameliorated by alterations in the ways that people live. The courses in this area focus on knowledge and skills necessary for the appreciation and enhancement of a healthful lifestyle. They emphasize health and physical well-being throughout the life span and explore major health issues, physical fitness, and effective use of leisure.

Minimum of three credits required.

HED 207Youth Health Issues3
HPR 105Creating A Healthy, Active Lifestyle3
SAH 105Analysis of Health, Wellness and Disease for the Health Care Consumer3

University-wide Learning
Interdisciplinary course
Contact: Jo Arney or Sharie Brunk
425 H Wimberly Hall or 1140 Centennial Hall
608.785.6641 or 608.785.6951
e-mail: jarney@uwlax.edu or sbrunk@uwlax.edu

www.uwlax.edu/gened/uwl100.htm

This course is offered to new students to help them transition to UW-La Crosse and to college life. The course is applicable to the General Education Program under Self and Society: Understanding Oneself and the Social World.

+UWL 100 Cr.1

First Year Student Seminar

Students of this course will, individually and together in groups, pursue the question "What does it mean to be an educated person?" This question will be examined from many perspectives, particularly through three secondary questions: 1) What are the skills of an educated person? 2) What are the intellectual dispositions? 3) What contexts are needed? In pursuing these questions, students will practice and acquire the basic habits and patterns of inquiry through reading, discussion, writing, and involvement in campus activities. Course meets for 12 weeks. Offered Fall.


Literacy (GE 01)

+CST 110 Cr.3
Communicating Effectively

This course introduces students to major topic areas in communication while encouraging them to become more competent and culturally sensitive communicators. Students will develop speaking, relational and listening skills as they are exposed to the communication areas of interpersonal, group/teams and public contexts. This course will help students become more effective and ethical communicators in a highly diverse society. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 110 Cr.3
College Writing I

This course in composition addresses writing as a symbolic action that writers participate in for multiple purposes, with diverse audiences, and in various genres. It emphasizes writing as a thinking process through the learning and practice of rhetorical strategies for inquiry, persuasion, and collaboration in context. (Students who qualify with a grade of "C" or better in ENG 110 will be exempt from further writing requirements in the General Education skills category, but this does not exempt students from the writing emphasis course requirements. Students receiving a grade less than "C" must repeat ENG 110.) Prerequisite: ENG 050 or equivalent placement. Not open for credit for students with credit in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 112 Cr.3
College Writing AP (Advanced Placement)

This course in composition addresses writing as symbolic action that writers participate in for multiple purposes, with diverse audiences, and in various genres. It emphasizes writing as a thinking process through the learning and practice of rhetorical strategies for inquiry, persuasion, and collaboration in context. Students will be challenged at a level appropriate to their placement. (Students who qualify with a grade of "C" or better in ENG 112 will be exempt from further writing requirements in the general education skills category, but this does not exempt students from the writing emphasis course requirement. Students earning a grade lower than "C" must repeat ENG 112. Prerequisite: score of 3 or 4 on the AP Placement Tests (Rhetoric/Writing or Literature) or students with ENG 110  waiver from transfer institution. Not open for credit for students with credit in ENG 110 . Offered Fall, Spring.

Mathematical/Logical Systems and Modern Languages (GE 02)

Mathematics

+MTH 135 Cr.4
Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

This course is designed for prospective elementary teachers. Content strands include number and operations and algebra and functions. Number and operations topics include set theory and pre-number concepts, place-value and numeracy, multiple representations and algorithms for arithmetic, number theory (e.g. divisors, multiples), and proportional reasoning. Algebra and functions topics include the concepts of variable and function, algebraic thinking, linear, polynomial, rational, and exponential functions, mathematical models, rates of change, and multiple representations of relations. Aligned with state and national standards, this course will emphasize problem solving, communication, reasoning, and representation in mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH 050 or satisfactory placement test score; EC/MC or MC/EA major plan. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MTH 136 Cr.4
Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

This course is designed for prospective elementary teachers. Content strands include geometry and measurement, data analysis and statistics, and probability and discrete math. Topics from these strands include: properties of geometric figures, geometric measurement (length, area, volume), congruence and similarity, and transformations; descriptive statistics, sampling design and statistical comparisons, randomness and variability, inferential statistics (including the normal distribution); counting techniques, uniform and nonuniform distributions, and representations and calculations of probabilities for simple and compound events. Aligned with state and national standards, this course will emphasize problem solving, communication, reasoning, and representation in mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH 135 with a grade of "C" or better. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MTH 145 Cr.4
Elementary Statistics

An introductory course covering fundamentals of modern statistical methods. Topics include descriptive statistics, the binomial and normal distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The z, t, F and chi-square test statistics are introduced. Instruction in computer use is included, and statistics software is used throughout the course for analyzing data files and carrying out statistical procedures. Prerequisite: MTH 050 or an appropriate placement test score. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+MTH 150 Cr.4
College Algebra

A college algebra course on the properties, graphs, and applications of elementary functions. Topics include the real and complex numbers, concepts from analytic geometry, solutions to equations and inequalities, the elementary algebraic functions, and the logarithmic and exponential functions. Prerequisite: MTH 051 or two years of high school algebra and an appropriate placement test score. (Successful completion of MTH 151, MTH 175 or MTH 207 precludes taking MTH 150 for credit.) Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+MTH 151 Cr.4
Precalculus

A precalculus course on properties, graphs, and applications of elementary transcendental functions. Topics include concepts from analytic geometry; theory of equations; the logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions; and analytic trigonometry. Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in MTH 150 or two years of high school algebra and appropriate placement test score. (Successful completion of MTH 151 precludes taking MTH 150. Successful completion of MTH 207 precludes taking MTH 151.) Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+MTH 175 Cr.4
Applied Calculus

Basic concepts and methods from differential, integral, and multivariate calculus. Logarithmic and exponential functions are included, but not trigonometric functions. Emphasis of the course is on models and applications in business and the social, life, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in MTH 150 or two years of high school algebra and appropriate placement test score. (Successful completion of MTH 175 precludes taking MTH 150. Successful completion of MTH 207 precludes taking MTH 175.) Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+MTH 207 Cr.5
Calculus I

A rigorous introduction to calculus. Topics include limits, rules for differentiation, derivatives of trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions, the Mean Value Theorem, integration, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. In the area of applications, the course covers problems on related rates, extrema, areas, volumes, and Newton’s Second Law. Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in MTH 151 or four years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, and appropriate placement score. (Successful completion of MTH 207 precludes taking MTH 150, MTH 151, or MTH 175 for credit.) Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+MTH 208 Cr.4
Calculus II

A continuation of Calculus I with a rigorous introduction to sequences and series. Topics include techniques of integration and indeterminate forms, improper integrals, applications of integrals to the physical sciences, tests for the convergence of series, absolute convergence, power series, and Taylor’s Theorem with Remainder. First order linear differential equations are explored, as well as the geometry of space. Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in MTH 207. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MTH 265 Cr.4
Mathematical Models in Biology

An introduction to the use of calculus and stochastic based models to the biological sciences. Mathematical tools such as discrete and continuous differential equations, linear algebra, phase portraits, probability theory and descriptive and inferential statistics that are necessary to analyze and interpret biological models will be covered. Biological topics may include single species and interacting population dynamics, modeling infectious diseases, enzyme kinetics, and quantitative genetics. Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in MTH 175 or MTH 207. Offered Spring.

Languages and other logical systems

+CHI 102 Cr.4
Elementary Chinese II

The second introductory course in Chinese comprehension, speaking, writing, reading, and culture. Prerequisite: CHI 101 or placement. Offered Spring.

+CHI 201 Cr.4
Intermediate Chinese I

The first of two intermediate-level Chinese courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: CHI 102 or placement. Offered Fall.

+CHI 202 Cr.4
Intermediate Chinese II

The second of two intermediate-level Chinese courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHI 201 or placement. Offered Spring.

+FRE 102 Cr.4
Elementary French II

The second introductory course in French comprehension, speaking, writing, reading, and culture. Prerequisite: FRE 101 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 201 Cr.3
Intermediate French I

The first of two intermediate-level French courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 202 Cr.4
Intermediate French II

The second of two intermediate-level French courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in French. Prerequisite: FRE 201 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 102 Cr.4
Elementary German II

The second introductory course in German comprehension, speaking, writing, reading, and culture. Prerequisite: GER 101 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 201 Cr.4
Intermediate German I

The first of two intermediate-level German courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: GER 102 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 202 Cr.4
Intermediate German II

The second of two intermediate-level German courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in German. Prerequisite: GER 201 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+RUS 102 Cr.4
Elementary Russian II

The second introductory course in Russian comprehension, speaking, writing, reading and culture. Prerequisite: RUS 101 or placement. Offered Spring.

+RUS 201 Cr.4
Intermediate Russian I

The first of two intermediate-level Russian courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: RUS 102 or placement. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

+RUS 202 Cr.4
Intermediate Russian II

The second of two intermediate-level Russian courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in Russian. Prerequisite: RUS 201 or placement. Offered Spring.

+SPA 102 Cr.4
Elementary Spanish II

The second introductory course in Spanish comprehension, speaking, writing, reading, and culture. Prerequisite: SPA 101 or placement based on UW System Spanish Placement Test score. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SPA 103 Cr.4
Elementary Spanish I and II

This is an introductory course that covers in one semester the essential content of first-year Spanish. It is designed for students with two or more years of high school Spanish or with previous experience learning a foreign language. Special emphasis is placed on facilitating the development of oral communication. Prerequisites: a minimum of two years of high school foreign language and departmental placement. Not open to students who have taken SPA 101 or SPA 102. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SPA 201 Cr.4
Intermediate Spanish I

The first of two intermediate-level Spanish courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining speaking and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: SPA 102 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SPA 202 Cr.4
Intermediate Spanish II

The second of two intermediate-level Spanish courses. Students continue to develop all language skills with special emphasis placed on refining reading and writing in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 201 or placement based on UW System Placement Test scores. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MLG 102 Cr.4
World Languages: Elementary II

Oral and written language study, reading, grammar. A year of high school study in this language is equivalent to the 101 level as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: MLG 101 in the appropriate language. Offered Spring.

+MLG 201 Cr.4
World Languages: Intermediate I

Third semester oral and written language study, reading, grammar. Prerequisite: two years of high school or MLG 102 in this language. Offered Fall.

+MLG 202 Cr.4
World Languages: Intermediate II

Fourth semester oral and written language study, reading, grammar. Prerequisite: three years of high school or MLG 201 in this language. Offered Spring.

+MLG 204 Cr.4
Heritage Language: Intermediate

Taught in the heritage language specified, this course provides opportunities for students to develop intermediate-level heritage language reading and writing skills. Students learn the heritage language writing system in order to read and write short texts. Additional emphasis is placed on geographical variation within the heritage language. Prerequisite: ENG 110, native or near native speaking skills in the heritage language, consent of the instructor. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+ESL 250 Cr.4
ESL Speaking

Focus is on strategies and techniques for success in academic classes, including formal and informal oral discourse patterns needed for American classes. Prerequisite: non-native speakers of English and/or appropriate score on ESL placement test and/or successful completion of ESL 200. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+ESL 251 Cr.4
U.S. Culture and Film

Focus is on development of listening, speaking, reading and cultural understanding through the medium of American movies, television and related articles. Prerequisite: non-native speakers of English and/or appropriate score on ESL placement test. Offered Spring.

+ESL 252 Cr.4
ESL Writing/Grammar

Focus is on skills needed at every stage of the writing process: finding a topic, determining an approach to the topic, assessing the audience, planning and drafting a coherent composition, revising and editing. Students learn to adapt their writing to the American audience and topic and to look at their own writing critically. Prerequisite: non-native speakers of English and/or appropriate score on ESL placement test and/or successful completion of ESL 202. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+ESL 253 Cr.4
ESL Research paper

This course is designed to prepare students for college-level reading and writing challenges. It introduces students to the kind of writing that they are likely to encounter throughout their college career-summarizing, paraphrasing, critiquing, and synthesizing. The course reviews the process of research-gathering materials, selecting sources, and arranging information. Students will learn how to use and cite sources. Drafting, revising, and proofreading skills will be developed. Prerequisites: Non-native speakers of English and appropriate score on the ESL placement test and/or successful completion of ESL 202. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+CS 101 Cr.4
Introduction to Computing

Computers and computer software are an integral part of modern society. This course explores this relationship. Students will examine the computer as a problem-solving tool through the use of database, spreadsheets and small scale programming. Students will examine the computer as a communication tool through the use of word processing and the Internet. Other topics include the history and future of computer technology, computer hardware basics, man/machine relationships, applications of computers in various disciplines, and social/ethical issues. Credits earned in CS 101 cannot be applied to the CS major or minor. Offered Occasionally.

+CS 120 Cr.4
Software Design I

An introduction to the fundamentals of software development; including software classes, objects, inheritance, polymorphism, logic, selection control, repetition control, subprograms, parameter passage, and rudimentary software engineering techniques. Students complete numerous programming projects using a modern programming language. Prerequisite: MTH 151 or MTH 175 or math placement test scores at or above MTH 151. Offered Fall, Spring.

+CT 100 Cr.3
Introduction to Computational Thinking

Computational thinking represents a universally applicable collection of concepts and techniques borrowed from computer scientists. This course is designed to teach how to think algorithmically; to examine the ways that the world's information is encoded and how this impacts our lives; to explore the capabilities and limitations of computers from the past, the present and the future; to apply software design diagrammatic techniques to model real-world systems; to learn how the rules of logic apply to computation, reasoning and discourse; to examine how computers both enhance and constrain our lives; to explore many of the problem solving strategies used by software developers and how they are useful to you. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PHL 101 Cr.3
Introduction to Logic

An introduction to logic, the science of valid reasoning. This course introduces the student to both formal and informal methods of reasoning and evaluating arguments. Offered Fall, Spring.

Minority Cultures or Multiracial Women's Studies (GE 03)

+ECO 336 Cr.3
Women in the U.S. Economy (ES)

An introduction to the status of women in the U.S. economy. Topics include alternative perspectives on women, work and the labor force, the value of paid versus unpaid labor, pay equity, the social support network, and the prospects for change. Offered Fall, Spring.

+EFN 205 Cr.3
Understanding Human Differences (ES)

The course will focus on human differences and the factors which influence these differences, specifically group identifications. It will explore the interaction between misperceptions and ethnocentric perspectives which foster the development of prejudicial attitudes. It will explain the effect of prejudicial attitudes on expectations for 'different' others (stereotyping) and on behavior toward those others (discrimination). It will examine diverse groups in our society and how membership in one or more of these groups affects one’s sense of identity and one’s opportunities. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring.

+ENG/ERS 207 Cr.3
Multicultural Literature of the United States (ES)

This course examines cultural themes in American literature in an effort to enhance student awareness of the multi-ethnic nature of American culture. Students engage in close reading, discussion, analysis, and interpretation of texts written by individuals from a variety of American ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Content varies with instructors. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. (Cross-listed with ERS/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG/ERS 210 Cr.3
Literature of Black America (ES)

Survey and exploration of Black American prose and poetry from their eighteenth century beginnings to the end of the Harlem Renaissance and the depression years. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. (Cross-listed with ERS/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Fall.,Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG/ERS 215 Cr.3
African American Authors (ES)

A study of the principal post-depression (1940 to present) African American authors, critics, and scholars which clarifies the relationship between these writers and the general field of American literature and which illustrates their unique contributions as representatives of African American culture. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. (Cross-listed with ERS/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Spring.,Offered Fall, Spring.

+ERS 100 Cr.3
Introduction to Ethnic and Racial Studies (ES)

An examination of the persistence of minority and ethnic problems in the United States and consideration of the contributions, parallels, similarities, and differences between and among ethnic and minority groups. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+HIS 306 Cr.3
History of Ethnic America (ES)

The role and impact of immigrants and ethnic minorities on the political, economic and cultural development of the United States from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the immigrant experience - the problems of immigrant adjustment, patterns of immigrant mobility and assimilation, and the persistence of ethnicity and ethnic tensions. Offered Annually.

+HIS 336 Cr.3
Hispanics in the United States (ES)

This course will introduce students to the diverse experiences of Hispanic peoples in the United States through an interdisciplinary survey of their social, historical, political, economic, and cultural experiences. Offered Occasionally.

+MUS 209 Cr.3
History of Jazz Culture (ES)

A chronological study of the history of jazz from its African/Creole roots to the present with emphasis on ethnic cultural contributions and innovations through listening and selected readings. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PHL 335 Cr.3
Multicultural Philosophy in the United States (ES)

This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions found in the United States. The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen understanding and appreciation of the diversities of philosophies in the United States. Offered Alternate Years.

+POL 205 Cr.3
Women and Politics (ES)

An examination of the positions and roles of women in the political arena. This course discusses the nature and extent of women’s political involvement, both in the United States and abroad, with particular emphasis on the cultural and racial diversity of women political participants in the United States. Additional topics will include the legal status of women, differences between male and female political behavior, factors that influence women’s political participation and current political issues related to women. Offered Annually.

+PSY 285 Cr.3
Culture and Mental Health: An Applied Perspective (ES)

This course provides an examination of the relationship between culture and mental health. Specific attention is given to the impact of racism, prejudice, and minority status on the lives of various American minority groups and how the effects of these factors reveal themselves within a mental health framework. An eclectic, multidisciplinary approach that draws from clinical and social psychology, as well as sociology, is utilized. Prerequisite: PSY 100; sophomore standing. Offered Annually.

+PSY 318 Cr.3
Psychology of Women (ES)

Theories and research concerning the biological, psychological, and social aspects of female functioning will be evaluated. The course will analyze psychological literature that addresses itself to the experience, development, and behavior of women from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Prerequisite: PSY 100; sophomore standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SAH 307 Cr.3
Changing the Culture, Women in Science (ES)

This course will focus on the relationship between science and culture, specifically with regard to women. A comprehensive approach will be taken to explore both women’s roles in science and women as objects of scientific investigation. Issues that will be addressed include cultural and historical attitudes toward women in science, cultural and historical barriers fought against and overcome by women, and contributions of women to multiple scientific disciplines. Women as objects of psychological and physiological investigation will be explored, and knowledge will be applied to an assessment of how cultural and gender biases have impacted women’s health and lives. Junior Standing Offered Spring.

+SOC 225 Cr.3
Racial and Ethnic Minorities (ES)

This course offers a critical examination of the social dynamics shaping race and ethnicity in the United States. Students will examine both historic and contemporary issues related to race and ethnicity including the social construction of race, sources of prejudice, institutional and individual-level discrimination, power relations and stratification, and strategies for addressing racial and ethnic inequality. Emphasis is placed on the use of empirical evidence to evaluate popular beliefs about race and ethnicity in the United States. Offered Annually.

+WGS 100 Cr.3
Gender, Race and Class in American Institutions (ES)

This course provides an introduction to how gender, race and class have intertwined over time to produce women’s social roles and status in American culture. The creation, transmittal, interpretation and institutionalization of gender roles will be examined using family and kinship, the educational system, the media, work, government and the health care system. The course provides a critical, interdisciplinary perspective on scholarship which omits or distorts the female experience. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+WGS 210 Cr.3
Women's Voices / Women's Culture (ES)

An examination of how women have expressed female experience in a variety of forms, including fiction, autobiography, oral traditions, and song. By analyzing women’s words and forms of self-expression, students will explore what is individual and what is common in women’s lives, and will learn tools for understanding female experience and culture. Offered Occasionally.

+WGS 230 Cr.3
Women's Diversity: Race, Class, and Culture (ES)

This course explores the diversity of women’s experience in America as it has been affected by race, ethnicity, class, and other factors, and the effects of gender on women of different groups. Issues that have united and divided women in movements for social change are also addressed. Offered Fall, Spring.

International and Multicultural Studies (GE04)

World history

+HIS 101 Cr.3
Global Origins of the Modern World

This course explores the origins and development of the modern world, focusing on the dual dynamics of globalization and vital indigenous civilizations. The course will critically examine a minimum of three world civilizations, their ancient antecedents, and will include multiple themes, such as technology and science, religion, gender, war and peace, and the environment. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+HIS 102 Cr.3
Global Transition and Change

This course examines world history from the perspective of one specific theme, such as technology and science, religion, gender, cross-culture connections, war and peace, arts and literature, government, or the environment. The course is global in scope, covering a minimum of three world civilizations. Individual sections will trace the development of one theme over the course of major changes in world history, ancient origins to the present. Students will have their choice of sections, thus of themes. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

Global and multicultural studies

+ANT/ECO/GEO/HIS/POL/SOC 202 Cr.3
Contemporary Global Issues

This course will offer a contemporary multi-disciplinary perspective regarding the major issues and trends confronting the Global Society as it enters the 21st century. Emphasis will be given to a critical review and assessment of the origin and present condition of the plethora of situations and problems affecting modern Global Society. The student will also learn to critically evaluate current and future events. The course will incorporate the views and approaches of the following disciplines: sociology/anthropology, economics, geography, political science and history. Contemporary Global Issues Offered Annually.

+ART 301 Cr.3
World Art

This course will be an in-depth examination of art forms in various historical, social, and religious contexts of Africa, South and South East Asia, the Pacific, and the Americas, Students will explore issues, approaches and controversies in cross cultural civilizations through art as a primary source of understanding. They will experience how, through art, the values and ideas of many cultures have evolved and new patterns of globalization have shaped the modern world. Junior Standing Offered Fall, Spring.

+CHI 320 Cr. 3

Introduction to Chinese Civilization

This is a survey course covering the development of Chinese civilization from the beginnings to the 20th century. It introduces the evolution and continuities of this ancient culture seen through the lens of philosophy, religion, ritual, social relations, institutions, and achievements. This course is taught in English for students who want a basic appreciation of this important non-Western culture. No experience with the Chinese language or culture is required. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

+ECO 120 Cr.3
Global Macroeconomics

Introduction to the functioning of the world economy. Applications of economic principals to domestic and international problems with an introduction to economic systems, economic thought, and economic history around the world. General topics include the economics of international exchange rates, global macroeconomics, international monetary systems, and economic development. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+ENG 208 Cr.3
International Studies in Literature

A study of representative authors from selected regions and ages of the world, ranging from such non-Western traditions as the Indic, Arabic, African, Chinese, and Japanese to such Western traditions as the Icelandic, Scandinavian, Australian, Russian, and South American. Content and focus vary with instructors. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Occasionally.

+ENV 201 Cr.3
Introduction to Environmental Studies

An interdisciplinary, introductory seminar which will explore current environmental issues from a variety of perspectives (scientific, historical, and social) and disciplines (natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities). Attitudes toward the natural world and approaches to public and private decision-making will also be examined. Some field trips will be used to examine local and regional practices and issues. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FRE 220 Cr.3
France and the Francophone World

This course offers both historical and contemporary perspectives on France and its relationship to the Francophone world. Students will examine French history and colonialism and their impact on such regions/countries as Quebec, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Senegal, Tahiti, and the Maghreb (North Africa). This course will also explore the multiple identities (based on ethnicity, race, gender and sexual orientation) that continue to "disrupt" the notion of a collective French consciousness as it persists today. These include North-African and Russian immigrants, Jews, women, gays and lesbians. Taught in English. Offered Spring.

+GEO 110 Cr.3
World Cultural Regions

This course provides an understanding of the global distribution of world cultures. The cultural, economic and natural patterns and their interrelationships are examined on a global and regional scale. The development and distribution of cultural regions within countries are included when appropriate. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GEO 200 Cr.3
Conservation of Global Environments

Introduction to natural resources, resource management, environmental and land use ethics, environmental impacts of resource utilization and strategies to resolve environmental conflicts. Course examines the relationships between society and the environment from the global to the local scale. Offered Fall, Spring.

+HIS 101 Cr.3 (whichever was not taken from "World history" above)
Global Origins of the Modern World

This course explores the origins and development of the modern world, focusing on the dual dynamics of globalization and vital indigenous civilizations. The course will critically examine a minimum of three world civilizations, their ancient antecedents, and will include multiple themes, such as technology and science, religion, gender, war and peace, and the environment. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+HIS 102 Cr.3 (whichever was not taken from "World history" above)
Global Transition and Change

This course examines world history from the perspective of one specific theme, such as technology and science, religion, gender, cross-culture connections, war and peace, arts and literature, government, or the environment. The course is global in scope, covering a minimum of three world civilizations. Individual sections will trace the development of one theme over the course of major changes in world history, ancient origins to the present. Students will have their choice of sections, thus of themes. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+INS 250 Cr.1
Orientation to Study Abroad

This course is required for students accepted into all semester-long study abroad programs offered under the auspices of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. It is designed to provide an introduction to the various challenges (cultural, social, linguistic, academic, political, and economic) related to resident study and research in a foreign country. Students learn about stages and theories associated with culture shock, intercultural sensitivity and communication, and reverse culture shock. Students also learn how to apply these theories to their own upcoming international experience. Must complete INS 250, INS 251, and INS 252 to receive general education credit. Consent of department. Offered Fall, Spring.

+INS 251 Cr.1
Study Abroad Practicum: Journaling

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the various stages and theories associated with culture shock, intercultural sensitivity and communication and reverse culture shock presented in INS 250. Through journaling students will apply an understanding of the various stages and theories associated with culture shock to their lived experiences in their host country. To accomplish this, students will complete a series of guided written assignments that deal with these specific topics. Students must complete this course while on study abroad. Must complete INS 250, INS 251, and INS 252 to receive general education credit. Prerequisite: INS 250. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+INS 252 Cr.1
Cross-Cultural Reentry From Study Abroad

This course is designed for students returning from a study abroad experience. This course will review the concept of re-entry shock discussed in INS 250, examine the process of re-entry, and provide strategies for integrating the study abroad experience with academics, professional goals and personal development. Must complete INS 250, INS 251, and INS 252 to receive general education credit. Prerequisite:INS 250, INS 251. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MIC 130 Cr.3
Global Impact of Infectious Disease

A multifaceted examination of issues related to infectious disease throughout the world. The course will begin with historical examples of how infectious disease has impacted society, from plagues of centuries past to recent emerging diseases. After defining the types of pathogens and methods for their control, the interplay between infectious disease and global economics, health and politics will be evaluated. Additionally, the impact of public perceptions and misconceptions on the spread of infectious disease will be analyzed. Finally, the role of current human activities in shaping disease patterns of the future will be explored. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+MLG 304 Cr.4
Heritage Language: Advanced

Taught in the heritage language specified, this course provides opportunities for students to develop advanced-level heritage language reading and writing skills. Students read authentic heritage language manuscripts, practice heritage language narrative and expository writing, translate documents in their fields, and explore heritage language features related to social customs. Prerequisite: ENG 110, native or near native speaking skills in the heritage language, intermediate-level reading and writing skills in the heritage language. Consent of instructor. Offered Occasionally.

+MUS 201 Cr.3
Musical Cultures

World music from a global perspective, celebrating both the similarities and differences of musical expressions. Exemplary artistic, folkloric, and popular music cultures of the world are compared to those of the Medieval and Renaissance eras. An introduction to hearing these expressions as cultural phenomena, using objective methods of study that lead to a general understanding of music by visual and aural analysis and by hearing music in its cultural context. Prerequisite: MUS 105 or MUS 110 or music major or minor. Offered Fall.

+MUS 204 Cr.3
Latin American Music: Its Context and Impact

A survey of Latin American musical styles, their cultural contexts, and their impact in the U.S. An assessment of religious, artistic, and popular music, focusing on major schools and traditions in Latin America. The course develops from a geographical, chronological approach ranging from pre-Columbian to European and African manifestations in the 20 Latin American republics, with emphasis on the Hispanic domination. Then the course traces the U.S. impact of Mexicans in the southwest since the California missions, Puerto Ricans in New York, and Cubans in Miami; the inroads of Latin dances on jazz and rock. Offered Occasionally.

+PHL 336 Cr.3
International Multicultural Philosophy

This survey course will examine philosophical ideas and systems that are generated from a wide range of cultural traditions world wide. The aim of this search will be to broaden and deepen our understanding and appreciation of the multiplicity of philosophical perspectives which are part of an increasingly diverse, interconnected, and globalized world. Prerequisite: PHL 100 or PHL 200. Offered Alternate Years.

+PHY 142 Cr.3
Navigating Global Nuclear Issues

This course will serve as an introduction to the topic of nuclear weapons, energy and policy in society. This includes the social, economic, cultural and political aspects surrounding the development of nuclear weapons and their place in the world, especially in current events. International organizations will be discussed along with their role in regulation and recommending economic sanctions. We will look at the resurgence of nuclear energy and how it affects everything from the environment to global trade. Finally, the role of terrorism and the impact this has on shaping the human experience will be explored. Offered Fall, Spring.

+POL 234 Cr.3
Comparative Political Systems

The course is devoted to the comparison and the critical analysis of selected topical global societies and regions. A general comparative framework will be utilized to develop a critical assessment of a representative sample of developed and developing contemporary societies. Emphasis will be given to a comparative study of institutions and their functions, various administrative and decision-making processes, and contemporary problems and issues. Finally, implications in the 21st century will also be discussed. Offered Fall.

+PSY 282 Cr.3
Cross-Cultural Psychology

An orientation to the definitions, concepts, theories, and methodologies of cross-cultural psychology. Included is an examination of cultural and ecological factors and their influences on perceptual and cognitive processes, personality, language, and other psychological variables. Prerequisite: PSY 100. Offered Fall, Spring.

+THA 351 Cr.3
World Theatre

Survey of historical and contemporary theatre in cultural context from various cultures/geographic regions around the world. These areas include India and the near east, China, Japan, and the far east, Africa, Latin America, and the middle east. Particular attention is paid to local custom, religious practice and theatrical practice. Prerequisite: THA 110. Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

Science (GE05)

Natural laboratory sciences

+ANT 102 Cr.4
Introduction to Physical Anthropology

This course introduces the basic fields of physical anthropology: population genetics, human osteology, primatology, pale anthropology, and forensics. The class provides a substantive framework for learning about the biological diversity of the human species through scientific inquiry. The foundations of evolutionary theory and the fossil evidence for human evolution are also presented. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Offered Annually.

+BIO 103 Cr.4
Introductory Biology

A survey of modern biology. Subjects discussed include ecology, cell biology and genetics. Themes developed through the course are the use of the scientific method and the relationships between society, technology and science. This course is designed as a general education course for non-science or non-allied health majors. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Students cannot earn credit in both BIO 103 and BIO 105. Offered Fall, Spring.

+BIO 105 Cr.4
General Biology

An introduction to biology including topics in ecology, population biology, nutrient cycling, food webs, cell structure and function, metabolism, photosynthesis, reproduction, genetics, molecular biology and evolution. This course provides a strong foundation for further science courses, and is designed for science majors, allied health majors and students with an interest in science. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Students cannot earn credit in both BIO 103 and BIO 105. Offered Fall, Spring.

+CHM 100 Cr.4
Contemporary Chemistry

A survey course focusing on applied chemistry. Fundamental chemistry and science concepts are developed and then used to study applications of this science to technology in society. Emphasis is placed on selected topics that are current. Course is not applicable to a major or minor in chemistry and does not meet the prerequisite requirement of any other chemistry course. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Offered Fall.

+CHM 103 Cr.5
General Chemistry I

An introduction to chemistry including topics in atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, chemical stoichiometry, reactivity, states of matter, solutions, acid-base theory, and nuclear chemistry, and also including selected topics in descriptive and applied chemistry. Scientific inquiry, experimental design and data analysis are included. Lect. 3, Lab 3, Disc. 1. Prerequisite: MTH 150 or placement into MTH 151 or higher. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+ESC 101 Cr.4
Earth Environments

This course concentrates on understanding the earth’s dynamic environments through the study of processes and physical and human interactions related to the lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. A scientific approach is used to examine fundamental concepts in earth and environmental science related to topics such as plate tectonics, landform development, atmospheric processes, global climate, and water resources, in order to provide an understanding of how the earth system functions and the human role in these phenomena. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MIC 100 Cr.4
Microbes and Society

Microbiology plays an integral role in human affairs and our daily lives. Some microorganisms have caused tremendous suffering throughout history, however many microbes have also provided countless benefits to humans and play vital roles in essential global cycles. This course examines the science of microbiology and the impact of microbiology on human affairs. The principles of microbial diversity, cell structure, growth and reproduction, global processes, disease, and prevention of disease are covered. Each topic provides a basis for discussion of current issues where microorganisms play a role. The laboratory provides an inquiry based approach to examining the diversity of microorganisms and their role in disease, spoilage, genetic engineering, food and antibiotic production, agriculture, and the environment. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PHY 103 Cr.4
Fundamental Physics I

A broad theoretical and experimental introduction to the study of physics using the techniques of algebra and trigonometry. Topics covered are kinematics with constant acceleration, vectors, Newton’s laws of motion, circular motion, work, energy, momentum, rigid body motion, angular momentum, torque, oscillatory motion, gravitation, fluid mechanics, waves, resonance and sound. Additional topics may be selected from the area of thermodynamics. Wherever possible, applications to other fields of science such as chemistry, biology, and medicine will be discussed.  Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: MTH 150 recommended. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+PHY 106 Cr.4
Physical Science for Educators

A survey course focusing on applied physical science and the nature of scientific knowledge. Fundamental theories about the nature and interactions of matter and energy are developed using self-paced, small group, inquiry based teaching modules. The scientific knowledge developed is applied to issues of technology in society and everyday use situations. Emphasis is on modeling science teaching practices advocated by state and national science education standards using active learner practices. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: elementary/middle level education major plan. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PHY 125 Cr.4
Physics for the Life Sciences

An introductory study of physics concepts using algebra and trigonometry, primarily for life science and allied health students. Description of matter, motion, energy, thermodynamics, waves, light, electricity and topics in modern physics, with application to the life sciences. Lect. 3, Lab. 2 Prerequisite: MTH 150 strongly recommended. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PHY/AST 155 Cr.4
Solar System Astronomy

An introduction to astronomy as a science, emphasizing patterns in the night sky, our own solar system, and the possibility of life on other worlds. Throughout the course, comparison of observations with theoretical models will be stressed. Topics studied include the size and scale of the solar system relative to the universe; the scientific method; astronomical observations; motions of the earth, moon, sun, and planets; creating a model of the solar system; what we learn about planets from light and gravity; the structure and formation of the solar system; the planets and their moons; comets, asteroids, and meteoroids; and the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe. Recent results, including those from NASA missions, will be incorporated into the course. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. (Cross-listed with AST, may only earn credit in PHY or AST.) Offered Fall.

+PHY/AST 160 Cr.4
Stars, Galaxies and the Universe

An introduction to astronomy as a science, emphasizing celestial objects beyond our solar system. Throughout the course, comparison of observations with theoretical models will be stressed. Topics studied include the size and scale of the universe, using light and gravity to study the cosmos, the sun, the properties of other stars, lives and deaths of stars, star clusters, black holes, the Milky Way galaxy, dark matter, other galaxies, quasars, Big Bang cosmology, dark energy, and gravitational waves. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent discoveries. Lect. 3, Lab. 2. (Cross-listed with AST/PHY; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Spring.

+PHY 203 Cr.4
General Physics I

A broad theoretical and experimental introduction to the study of physics using the techniques of algebra, trigonometry and calculus. Topics covered are one-and two-dimensional kinematics, motion with varying acceleration, vectors, Newton’s laws of motion, circular motion, work, energy, center of mass, momentum, rigid body motion, moment of inertia, angular momentum and torque. Additional topics may include oscillatory motion and gravitation. Wherever possible, applications to other fields of science and engineering will be discussed.  Lect. 3, Lab. 2. Prerequisite: MTH 207 or concurrent enrollment. Offered Fall.

Science, technology, and society

+BIO 102 Cr.3

Contemporary Issues in Biological Sciences

An intra-disciplinary approach to investigating current issues within the biological sciences. Specific topics under the general categories of health, medicine, environment, genetics, and industrial technology will be identified, described and characterized. The science underlying the issue will be explored and the potential impact (past and future) of applied scientific advances within the respective disciplines will be examined in depth. Not applicable to a major or minor in biology. Offered Occasionally.

+ESC 211 Cr.3

Global Warming and Climate Change

This course explores the scientific basis of global warming and climate change, and their current and likely impacts on human society and the environment, before addressing the action that could be taken by governments, by industry, and by individuals to mitigate the effect. Discussion of global warming is situated in the context of models of climate change, focusing on alternative interpretations of the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global warming. Offered Fall, Spring.

Self and Society (GE 06)

+ANT 101 Cr.3
Human Nature/Human Culture

This course is designed to focus student participation on discovering and understanding what it means to be human. The interdependency of human biology and culture are deciphered through a modern anthropological perspective. Offered Annually.

+ARC 100 Cr.3
Archaeology: Discovering Our Past

This course is an introduction to the fascinating world of archaeology designed as a detailed exploration of the methods used to learn about past human life before written records. Each student will be involved in the process of discovering our past. Not recommended for Archaeological Studies majors. Offered Annually.

+ART 302 Cr.3
Visual Language in the Global Classroom

This course provides a discovery of the connections between visual art and a variety of disciplines. Cultural values and the social institution of education will be examined. Through inquiry, analysis, and research, students will explore art as a form of perceptual, social, and cultural learning. Students will develop guiding questions, rubrics, and procedures for the instruction of visual art education and will consider a model of instruction which guides and nurtures creativity and higher level thinking skills. Prerequisite: completion of at least 45 university credits. Offered Fall, Spring.

+CHE 200 Cr.3
Public Health for the Educated Citizen

This course introduces the context and scope of public health from historical, modern, and postmodern perspectives. Historical perspective will be used to explain the philosophical foundations, ethics, methods, and essential services that make up public health. Modern perspectives will be used to explain a century of controlling communicable diseases, lengthening lives, and the emergence of new challenges. A postmodern perspective will be used to explore persistent health disparities, social determinants of health, and public health in an era of globalization. Participants will be challenged to consider their role in public health as citizens and/or professionals in a free society. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+CST 271 Cr.3
Contemporary Media in Everyday Life

This course offers an opportunity to explore contemporary media and their economic, social, political, and cultural implications in everyday life. This course will increase awareness of the motivations of media coverage, media effects on social and cultural change as well as on audience attitudes, the importance of social and cultural issues created or sustained by the media, and the necessity of a critical attitude while consuming media messages. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ECO 110 Cr.3
Microeconomics and Public Policy

Introduction to microeconomic principals and their application to decision-making by individuals, businesses, and government. General topics include supply and demand, market structures, product markets, government regulation, income distribution, international trade, and economic analysis of current social issues. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+ECO/THA 376 Cr.3
Economics of Art and Entertainment

The overall goal of this course is to enable participants to make or evaluate selected decisions and policy issues pertaining to the arts and to better understand the unique status the arts hold in the American economy. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Cross-listed with ECO/THA; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Spring - Odd Numbered Years.

+ENG 220 Cr.3
Women and Popular Culture

Fundamentals of cultural studies, with a focus on analyzing representations of women in modern American popular culture and their historical reception. Primary texts from media such as film, television, advertising, and popular fiction will be studied for how they communicate cultural values regarding women and femininity. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Occasionally.

+ERS 220 Cr.3
Ethnic and Racial Stereotyping in the Media

This course will trace how popular entertainment mediums such as film, television, books, comics, "wild west shows," music and cartoons have impacted perceptions of ethnic and racial groups from the early seventeenth century to the present. Besides analyzing the persuasive power of these types of mediums, it will examine why such representations were created and why they still persist. The mythopoeic image that surrounds American Indians, African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, and other minority groups will be juxtaposed against the historical reality that these groups have faced and the contemporary inequalities that we still must confront. Prerequisite: ERS 100. Offered Fall, Spring.

+FIN 207 Cr.3
Personal Finance

A survey course covering personal financial issues; topics include goal setting, budgeting, major purchases, loan provisions, taxation, insurance coverages, investment opportunities (including stocks, bonds, and mutual funds) and retirement planning. Open to students in all colleges. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GEO 102 Cr.3
Maps and Society

This course introduces all aspects of maps and how they affect the individual in society. It examines the evolution of maps, the map as an art form, the map as a communication medium for spatial knowledge, the meaning of maps and their relationship to culture and society past and present, the influence of maps on an individual through mass media and the Internet, and the way maps reflect personal and societal points of view. It focuses on privacy and civil liberty issues of the individual in the age of digital information where maps and map databases can disclose the privacy of personal space. In addition, today’s GIS maps (in planning, in marketing, in hazard controls, etc.) embed substantial amounts of personal information that can affect personal security and how our lives are directly, indirectly, knowingly, and unknowingly influenced. Offered Fall, Spring.

+GER 398 Cr.3
German Thinkers and Popular Culture

A course that critically examines instances of popular culture such as Hollywood movies, reality TV, pop songs, social media sites, and bestselling novels through the lens of various philosophical traditions. Focusing predominantly on German thinkers from the 18th-20th centuries such as Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Freud, and Benjamin, the course explores how their ideas can help a person today find deeper meaning in pop culture, as well as how pop culture might aid in understanding these thinkers' difficult theories. Taught in English. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

+POL 101 Cr.3
American National Government

An introduction to the underlying principles and values, administrative and political decision-making processes, and institutions of American national government in an international context utilizing a comparative approach. The course includes discussion, analysis and development of critical thinking skills related to public policy-making problems and current issues. The course emphasizes the development of intellectual skills associated with an informed, involved and active citizenry. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+POL 102 Cr.3
State and Local Government

An introduction to the underlying principles of federalism and focus on the new increasing decentralization of government program responsibilities to subnational governments in the United States. This is complemented by a comparison of the complex cultural, economic and intergovernmental settings of subnational governments. Students consider the implications of different environments for citizen participation, government characteristics, policy processes, and values associated with policy outcomes. The course emphasizes constructive citizenship in an environment where subnational governments will increasingly affect their lives. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PSY 100 Cr.3
General Psychology

A comprehensive introduction to contemporary basic principles and theories of behavior and related processes along with supporting scientific evidence and applications. Topics include sensory processes, perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, developmental change, measurement, social interaction and abnormal behavior. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+SOC 110 Cr.3
The Social World

An analysis of the complex relationship between society, the individual and the physical environment. It examines such questions as: how social patterns develop and persist over time; how the individual is shaped by social, cultural and environmental factors; why societies are constantly changing; and how individuals, through social interaction, shape their social world. Cross-cultural comparisons will be emphasized, showing how society and the physical environment affect the life choices of individuals. Offered Annually.

+SOC 120 Cr.3
Social Problems

Social analysis, critical thinking, and problem solving are introduced as basic social science skills. These skills are applied to major contemporary social problems related to deviant behavior, social inequality, social change, and problems associated with major societal institutions. A variety of individual and collective responses and social policy strategies at local, national, and international levels are examined. Offered Fall.

+THA 130 Cr.3
Multicultural U.S. Plays: Acting the Text

In this performance-based course students will study and perform dramatic literature from multiple cultures within the U.S. society. Plays will be selected from African-American, Asian-American, Native American, Hispanic-American, Lesbian/Gay/Transgendered/Bisexual and other cultures for study. Students will research cultural context, analyze the plays, develop basic skills in performance, and prepare and perform scenes from the plays under study, in order to enhance student awareness and exchange ideas about the multicultural nature of the U.S. No acting experience required. Offered Spring.

+UWL 100 Cr.1
First Year Student Seminar

Students of this course will, individually and together in groups, pursue the question "What does it mean to be an educated person?" This question will be examined from many perspectives, particularly through three secondary questions: 1) What are the skills of an educated person? 2) What are the intellectual dispositions? 3) What contexts are needed? In pursuing these questions, students will practice and acquire the basic habits and patterns of inquiry through reading, discussion, writing, and involvement in campus activities. Course meets for 12 weeks. Offered Fall.

Humanistic Studies (GE 07)

Literature

+CHI 305 Cr.3
Introduction to Modern Chinese Literature

This course provides a general survey of the most important Chinese writers of the 20th century and their works. Literary works are discussed in their social, cultural, and historical contexts. Taught in English and based entirely on translated texts, the course is ideal for students with little or no Chinese background who are nevertheless drawn to one of the most vibrant literary cultures in the world. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

+ENG 200 Cr.3
Literature and Human Experience

Intensive study of selected literary texts, with emphasis on various ways of reading, studying, and appreciating literature as an aesthetic, emotional, and cultural experience. Content varies with instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 201 Cr.3
American Literature I

An exploration of American literature from early times to the late nineteenth century; including such authors as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, and Dickinson. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 202 Cr.3
American Literature II

An exploration of American literature from the late nineteenth century to the present; including such authors as Twain, Freeman, James, Chopin, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, Wright, and Bellow. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 203 Cr.3
English Literature I

Encounters with major works of English literature from medieval times through the eighteenth century, including fiction, drama, essays, and poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 204 Cr.3
English Literature II

Encounters with major works of English literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including fiction, drama, essays, and poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 205 Cr.3
Western Literature I

An examination of the expression and development of the ideas and values of Western Civilization in time-honored works of literature ranging from Biblical times, through the Greek and Roman eras, to the European Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall.

+ENG 206 Cr.3
Western Literature II

An examination of the conflicting ideas and values of Western Civilization as expressed in the literature of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries; with special attention to the literary and cultural impact of science and modern philosophy and the roots and identity of the modern age. Prerequisite:ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Spring.

+GER 399 Cr.3
German Literature in Translation

A course designed to introduce students to great works of German literature. The course will center on representative writings by leading authors of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries whose works illustrate important aspects of German history and culture. In general these will be longer works of fiction and/or multiple works by such writers as Kafka, Goethe, Kleist, Mann, Boll, Grass, Wolf, etc. Works and authors will vary. Offered Fall - Even Numbered Years.

+MLG 299 Cr.3
Foreign Literature in Translation

The primary focus of this course is on major and representative works originally written in French, German, Russian, Spanish and Chinese. The course is team-taught in English by specialists of the respective literatures. Content and theme vary with instructors. Offered Spring.

+RUS 305 Cr.3
Golden Age Russian Literature and Culture

A course designed to introduce students to the great Russian writers of the 19th century, a period referred to as the Golden Age of Russian literature. Literary works will be discussed in their social, cultural, and historical context. The course will center on works by such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. Taught in English. Offered Spring - Even Numbered Years.

Other humanities

+HIS 205 Cr.3
History of Ethical Values in World Religions

This course is a comparative historical survey of selected religions which focuses upon the distinctive ways that each religion developed norms of good and bad behavior that it imposed upon its adherents. What behaviors did each religious tradition label as good or bad, pure or impure? Why did each tradition place behaviors in those categories? How did those value judgments concerning good and bad behaviors change over the centuries? Some of the topics covered in this comparative historical fashion will include the treatment of women, attitudes toward abortion, contraception, sex outside of marriage, homosexuality, war, attitudes towards other religions, and environmental ethics. Offered Spring.

+PHL 100 Cr.3
Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the major views on important philosophic topics such as personal identity, freedom, knowledge, morality, religion, and social justice. Students cannot earn credit for the philosophy major/minor in both PHL 100 and PHL 200. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+PHL 200 Cr.3
Introduction to the Literature of Philosophy

An examination of the expression, development and conflict of the ideas and values in current and time-honored works of philosophy from major world cultures. Topics to be studied include religion, ethics, knowledge, personal identity, justice and freedom. Students cannot earn credit for the philosophy major/minor in both PHL 100 and PHL 200. Offered Fall, Spring.

+POL 251 Cr.3
Justice, Power, and Politics

An introduction to consequential ideas in political philosophy, including justice, power, freedom, equality, and democracy. The course provides a foundation for understanding the philosophical assumptions and arguments across a range of significant political questions, and investigates the intellectual roots of historical and contemporary political ideas. The course emphasizes the development of intellectual skills needed to analyze political arguments, and highlights the practical implications of answering theoretical questions about politics. Offered Fall, Spring.

Arts (GE 08)

+ART 102 Cr.2
Art Appreciation

Discovering the visual world. An introduction to the visual arts of applied arts, architecture, craft arts, film/video arts, painting/drawing, printing/ graphic arts, and sculpture. The student will learn to use analysis and evaluation to explore the meaning of art. Offered Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer.

+ART 160 Cr.3
General Art Foundations

An introductory course in visual art, with emphasis on understanding the methods of art making in a variety of studio disciplines. Topics include recognition of visual elements and principles of design, methods of applying these elements and principles throughout a variety of art forms, thematic development, relationship of the visual arts to other fields of human endeavor, and an introduction to writing about visual art. Course content includes representative paradigms of world art, Western art, multicultural and contemporary art. Critical thinking is explored through responses to the visual arts through active involvement with various creative processes and media. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ART 172 Cr.3
Photography Survey

This course is a thematic examination of photography as an art form. Through lectures, films, hands on assignments and in class discussions, students will learn important conceptual and visual trends employed in art photography. Topics covered will include: 19th and 20th century influences, multi-cultural interpretation of genres, new approaches to representation of self and the influence of digital technology on photography. Students will also learn about individual and collective cultural models utilized to form the complex visual language of photographs. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ESS 104 Cr.2
Dance Appreciation

This course attempts to develop an awareness and appreciation of the role of dance in human society through the study of its purposes, functions and various forms. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MUS 105 Cr.2
Music Appreciation

The Western classical tradition. A survey of the forms and styles within each period since the Baroque. Emphasis on the content of specific masterpieces to enhance perceptive learning. Not open to students with credit in MUS 110. Not applicable to major or minor. Offered Fall, Spring.

+MUS 110 Cr.3
The Listening Experience in Music

An introductory course to music listening, with emphasis on methods of perceiving and understanding musical information. Topics include factors in listening, recognition of musical elements and other concepts which contribute to aural perception, and understanding the influence of musical context. The course content will include representative examples of world music, compositions by women, and representative music from the Western classical tradition. Prerequisite: Not open to students with credit in MUS 105. Not applicable to major or minor. Offered Occasionally.

+MUS 317 Cr.3
Musical Classroom

Contextual music methodology course designed for elementary classroom teachers. This course is intended to explore the role of the classroom teacher. The emphasis of the course is to incorporate music into the daily class activities through performance and teaching opportunities. The course content will include listening to representative selections of Western classical, American, and Asian music in relation to its historical, social, and cultural contexts. Not applicable to the music major or minor. Most appropriate for Teacher Education. Offered Fall, Spring.

+PHL 332 Cr.3
Philosophy of the Arts

An examination of aesthetic experience and the questions that are relevant to works of art. Topics discussed include: art and the emotions, aesthetic responses to everyday experiences, morality and the arts, standards of taste, and how to define art. Offered Annually.

+THA 110 Cr.2
Theatre Appreciation

A study of theatre as an art form. Emphasis on the role of the audience as collaborators in the performance and their understanding and appreciation of the elements of a theatrical production. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

+THA 120 Cr.3
Acting for Non-Majors

This course emphasizes the development of the actor’s instrument by introducing the student to the basic imaginative, physical, and vocal skills necessary for acting. It also enhances the student’s understanding of the cooperative nature of acting. It prepares them to create, discuss, rehearse, and perform. The student will apply these techniques in an interactive studio setting. Offered Spring.

+THA 201 Cr.3
Dramatic Literature and Theatre Arts

From text to theatre, how does dramatic literature translate into live performance? To read plays is but one aspect of the art of drama. To create a theatrical performance from a playscript is to appreciate the full artistic potential of dramatic literature. International and multicultural theatre ranging from the classical to the contemporary will be the basis for explorations into the significance and beauty of the dramatic arts. An interdisciplinary approach in both content and method will be used as the dramatic literature is considered in the context of history and culture, literature and art. Offered Fall.

Health and Physical Well-Being (GE 09)

+HED 207 Cr.3
Youth Health Issues

This exploratory course is designed to identify the health issues that affect youth throughout various stages of their development. Societal institutions that support the healthy growth and development of youth will be identified, while students consider strategies that enable the healthy mental/emotional, physical, and social development of today’s youth between the ages of 4-18. Offered Fall, Spring.

+HPR 105 Cr.3
Creating A Healthy, Active Lifestyle

This course will focus on the knowledge and skills necessary for developing and maintaining a healthy, physically active lifestyle throughout one’s lifespan. Major issues directly affecting one’s health such as physical fitness, movement skills and activities, health promotion and disease prevention, the effective use of leisure and content in various wellness topical areas will be included. Offered Fall, Spring.

+SAH 105 Cr.3
Analysis of Health, Wellness and Disease for the Health Care Consumer

In our technological world, health research and information is expanding rapidly and has become readily available to consumers. As life-long consumers of this information and health care services, students need to be able to understand the principles on which healthcare is based and to interpret this information in its application to their personal, family and community situations. This course uses an inquiry- based format to consider topics in nutrition, pharmaceuticals, cancer, communicable disease, contraception and sexually transmitted disease, chronic diseases, environmental impacts on health, recreation, fitness, epidemiology and disease prevention. Offered Fall, Spring.

Back to Top