2014-15 Catalog

English (ENG)

College of Liberal Studies
Department Chair: Susan Crutchfield
433A Wimberly Hall; 608.785.8295
E-mail: scrutchfield@uwlax.edu

http://www.uwlax.edu/english/

The Department of English specializes in the study of literature, linguistics, rhetoric, writing, and teaching. Our dynamic and interdisciplinary work fosters an appreciation for the beauty and power of the English language, promotes open inquiry, excites the imagination, and arouses intellectual curiosity. In the tradition of liberal arts education, we promote analytic skills and encourage scholarship from our faculty and students alike. Emphasizing the practical application of knowledge, we empower our students long past graduation and enrich the pleasure they find in reading, writing, and teaching. The Department of English examines what readers do when they read and what writers do when they write. Through language and story, humans interpret the past, understand the present and prepare for the future. We believe that the close study of language, writing, and literature should be a transformative experience culminating in literate, articulate, imaginative and open-minded individuals who can take on roles as responsible citizens in diverse and dynamic communities.

A VIBRANT COMMUNITY

Boasting a low student-to-teacher ratio and small classes, UW–L’s Department of English is like “family,” according to one recent graduate reflecting back from her new life in graduate school. Our student-run English Club, campus chapter of the National English Honor Society, and various student-run publications give majors and minors many opportunities to share their passion for reading and writing with each other, the department, and the community.


General education writing emphasis

This department incorporates a significant amount of writing through the required courses instead of identifying particular courses as writing emphasis courses. Students who complete a major in this department will fulfill the general education writing emphasis requirement.

For English majors/writing minors

English majors who elect to take one of the writing minors must complete the requirements for both the major and the minor. Only three credits from the major may also be counted toward the minor.

For English minors/writing minors

English minors who elect to take a writing minor must complete the requirements for both. Only nine credits from the English minor may also be counted toward the writing minor.


Professors

Bradley Butterfield

Virginia Crank

Lalita Pandit Hogan

Sharon Jessee

Haixia Lan

Heidi Macpherson

Joseph Young

Associate Professor

Matt Cashion

Susan Crutchfield

Natalie Eschenbaum

David Hart

Gary Konas

Darci Thoune

Assistant Professor

William Barillas

Kimberly DeFazio

Rebekah Fowler

James Gray

Heidi Jones

Bryan Kopp

Stephen Mann

Marie Moeller

Kate Parker

Lindsay Steiner

William Stobb

Kelly Stulzbach

Robert Wilkie

Lei Zhang

Lecturer

Ryan Friesen

Bruce Handtke

Karen Hart

Jen Mohlenhoff-Baggett

Luke Schaaf

Associate Lecturer

Carlton Clark

Sara Heaser

Joel Kopplin

Deborah-Eve Lombard

Adam Putz

Jan Wellik

Administrative Support

Amy Sloan

+ next to a course number indicates a general education course

Courses

ENG 050 Cr.3

Fundamentals of Composition

English 050 will facilitate fluency in writing. It will prepare students for the writing demands encountered in English 110 and other academic environments. To learn conventions of formal academic writing and to understand and employ effective writing processes and habits are the objectives of this course. *Transcript credit does not count toward graduation. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall.

+ENG 110 Cr.3

College Writing I

This course in composition addresses writing as a symbolic action that writers participate in for multiple purposes, with diverse audiences, and in various genres. It emphasizes writing as a thinking process through the learning and practice of rhetorical strategies for inquiry, persuasion, and collaboration in context. (Students who qualify with a grade of "C" or better in ENG 110 will be exempt from further writing requirements in the General Education skills category, but this does not exempt students from the writing emphasis course requirements. Students receiving a grade less than "C" must repeat ENG 110.) Prerequisite: ENG 050 or equivalent placement. Not open for credit for students with credit in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 112 Cr.3

College Writing AP (Advanced Placement)

This course in composition addresses writing as symbolic action that writers participate in for multiple purposes, with diverse audiences, and in various genres. It emphasizes writing as a thinking process through the learning and practice of rhetorical strategies for inquiry, persuasion, and collaboration in context. Students will be challenged at a level appropriate to their placement. (Students who qualify with a grade of "C" or better in ENG 112 will be exempt from further writing requirements in the general education skills category, but this does not exempt students from the writing emphasis course requirement. Students earning a grade lower than "C" must repeat ENG 112. Prerequisite: score of 3 or 4 on the AP Placement Tests (Rhetoric/Writing or Literature) or students with ENG 110 waiver from transfer institution. Not open for credit for students with credit in ENG 110. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 200 Cr.3

Literature and Human Experience

Intensive study of selected literary texts, with emphasis on various ways of reading, studying, and appreciating literature as an aesthetic, emotional, and cultural experience. Content varies with instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 201 Cr.3

American Literature I

An exploration of American literature from early times to the late nineteenth century; including such authors as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, and Dickinson. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 202 Cr.3

American Literature II

An exploration of American literature from the late nineteenth century to the present; including such authors as Twain, Freeman, James, Chopin, Frost, Hemingway, Faulkner, Wright, and Bellow. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 203 Cr.3

English Literature I

Encounters with major works of English literature from medieval times through the eighteenth century, including fiction, drama, essays, and poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 204 Cr.3

English Literature II

Encounters with major works of English literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including fiction, drama, essays, and poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 205 Cr.3

Western Literature I

An examination of the expression and development of the ideas and values of Western Civilization in time-honored works of literature ranging from Biblical times, through the Greek and Roman eras, to the European Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Fall.

+ENG 206 Cr.3

Western Literature II

An examination of the conflicting ideas and values of Western Civilization as expressed in the literature of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries; with special attention to the literary and cultural impact of science and modern philosophy and the roots and identity of the modern age. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Spring.

+ENG/ERS 207 Cr.3

Multicultural Literature of the United States (ES)

This course examines cultural themes in American literature in an effort to enhance student awareness of the multi-ethnic nature of American culture. Students engage in close reading, discussion, analysis, and interpretation of texts written by individuals from a variety of American ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Content varies with instructors. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. (Cross-listed with ERS/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Fall, Spring.

+ENG 208 Cr.3

International Studies in Literature

A study of representative authors from selected regions and ages of the world, ranging from such non-Western traditions as the Indic, Arabic, African, Chinese, and Japanese to such Western traditions as the Icelandic, Scandinavian, Australian, Russian, and South American. Content and focus vary with instructors. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Occasionally.

+ENG/ERS 210 Cr.3

Literature of Black America (ES)

Survey and exploration of Black American prose and poetry from their eighteenth century beginnings to the end of the Harlem Renaissance and the depression years. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. (Cross-listed with ERS/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Fall.

+ENG/ERS 215 Cr.3

African American Authors (ES)

A study of the principal post-depression (1940 to present) African American authors, critics, and scholars which clarifies the relationship between these writers and the general field of American literature and which illustrates their unique contributions as representatives of African American culture. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. (Cross-listed with ERS/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Spring.

+ENG 220 Cr.3

Women and Popular Culture

Fundamentals of cultural studies, with a focus on analyzing representations of women in modern American popular culture and their historical reception. Primary texts from media such as film, television, advertising, and popular fiction will be studied for how they communicate cultural values regarding women and femininity. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112 or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 299 Cr.1

Writing Tutor Practicum

Writing Tutor Practicum is designed to offer training and supervision for Writing Center tutors. The course will include an overview of writing center history and theory, an overview of writing process theory, and examination of best practices for tutoring various client populations. Students will develop a reflective tutoring practice based on readings and course discussions. The course must be taken during the student's first semester of employment in the Writing Center. Failure to complete the course will result in termination of employment in the Writing Center. Students who repeat the course will engage more deeply with the content. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Consent of instructor. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 301 Cr.4

Foundations for Literary Studies

An introduction to foundational knowledge and skills for the advanced study of literature. The course fosters understanding of the importance of historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts for literary study as well as appreciation for diversity of literary expression. Facility for critical work with literature is developed through expanding students’ knowledge of literary genres and their understanding and use of basic literary terminology and through enhancing their abilities to do literary research, conduct close textual analysis, and write critically about literature. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 302 Cr.3

Intermediate Topics in Literature

An intermediate course exploring selected topics in literature in relation to various historical or cultural contexts. Topics vary according to the interests of students and the instructor. Sample topics include: Horror Literature and Film; Classical Greek Drama and Culture; the Bible and/as Literature: Literature and Existentialism: Blues, Jazz, and Literature. Open to all students. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6 credits. Only 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Consult English Department for application to major or minor. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall.

ENG 303 Cr.3

Advanced Composition

An advanced college-level writing course. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills and strategies related to the theories and practices of various rhetorical contexts and genres. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 304 Cr.3

Writing in the Arts and Humanities

An advanced writing course designed especially for students majoring in the arts and humanities. The course will focus on the types of inquiry and discourse appropriate to these disciplines. Students will be instructed in the rhetorical strategies of invention (that is, discovering content and establishing lines of reasoning, analyzing audience, and determining the writer’s purpose and persona), arrangement and style. (Not open for credit in the English education major or minors except for credit in the professional writing minor.) Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; at least sophomore standing. Offered Annually.

ENG 305 Cr.3

Creative Writing

An advanced course which emphasizes the writing of poetry, short fiction, and analytical-evaluative writing about each of these genres. The course is taught by a practicing and published fiction writer or poet and is intended as the basic course in the creative writing English minor. It is also for those students interested in writing short fiction and/or poems. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 306 Cr.3

Writing in Education

An advanced writing course open to students who intend to become teachers in any field. This course helps students achieve several goals: understanding and practicing the several steps of the writing process and the various types of writing; exploring the ways in which writing can be a method of learning; strengthening composition skills; developing a 'theory of composition' (a set of principles) which will serve students well both as writers and as teachers of writing. (Not open for credit in the creative writing minor.) Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; at least sophomore standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 307 Cr.3

Writing for Management, Public Relations and the Professions

An advanced course focusing on written communication for relations with clients, boards, organizations, customers, constituents, or the public. Students practice writing as an effective process of gathering and conveying information, answering questions, and solving problems. The course will explore appropriate language, tone, and format for effective letters, memos, news releases, reports, proposals, abstracts, and summaries. There is emphasis on purpose, audience, and clarity. (Not open for credit in the English education major or minors except for credit in the professional writing minor.) Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; at least sophomore standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 308 Cr.3

Technical Writing

An advanced writing course designed for technically oriented students whose career goals require skill in conveying technical information through writing. Students will become acquainted with the types of writing forms and rhetorical styles which they are likely to encounter as professionals and will practice using these styles with technical subjects. (Not open for credit in the English education major or minors except for credit in the professional writing minor.) Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; at least sophomore standing. Offered Annually.

ENG 309 Cr.3

Writing in the Sciences

An advanced writing course for students in the sciences. The course will focus both on the role writing plays in the conduct of scientific work and on the rhetorical and stylistic conventions of the various scientific disciplines: in short, on the relationship between writing and scientific knowledge. Taught through an inquiry process, students will be led to develop their composition skills and understanding as they discover the procedures and conventions of their individual disciplines. (Not open for credit in the English education major or minors except for credit in the professional writing minor.) Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; at least sophomore standing. Offered Annually.

ENG 311 Cr.3

Critical Theory

Students in this course will study various major theoretical schools and begin to develop their conceptual literacy in approaching literary and other cultural texts (for example, creative and other modes of writing, public discourses, aesthetic and/or social movements, images, film, and other media). The course will facilitate students' dynamic participation in the unfolding conversations and debates about texts and culture. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 313 Cr.3

Prose Style and Editing

A practical course in developing a flexible and effective capacity for writing prose. Students will master techniques and strategies of emphasis, coherence, clarity, conciseness, balance, and rhythm. Use of tropes and figures (particularly metaphorical language and imagery) and tone will be explored in the context of rhetorical appropriateness and strategy. The course will provide students with the fundamentals of prose technique-the basis for an art, which they can continue to refine and develop for the rest of their lives. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 314 Cr.3

Grant Writing

This course is designed to develop knowledge of theories and practices of grant writing by including topics such as conventions of proposal writing as well as political, social and cultural aspects and practices of grant writing. Students will develop skills in identifying sources of grant funding, engage in various research methods, and learn to rhetorically respond to requests for proposals. Students will also learn to write requests for proposals, and analyze varying stakeholders and writing situations. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Spring.

ENG 320 Cr.3

Literary Journal Production and Publication

A workshop course in literary magazine production and publication. The class will assemble and publish Steam Ticket, a nationally-distributed literary journal that attracts submissions from international authors and artists. Emphasis will be placed on inter-disciplinary and multicultural content and participation. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. Only 3 credits may be applied toward any individual major or minor. Prerequisite: 300 level writing course. Offered Spring.

ENG 325 Cr.3

Reporting and Copy Editing

Study of newsgathering methods; practice organizing and writing; assigning and directing reporting and writing; preparing news copy for publication. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Annually.

ENG 326 Cr.3

Feature and Specialized Writing

Writing feature articles for newspapers and magazines; includes study of genre and practice with information gathering, interviewing, and composing and editing techniques. Application of reporting and writing techniques to specialized areas of news, such as editorials, reviews, sports, science and business; includes critical and interpretive writing. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Annually.

ENG 327 Cr.3

Publishing in a Digital Age

Practice in and critical examination of publication design, including research, writing, editing, layout, design, theory, software, and digital imagery. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Fall.

ENG 330 Cr.3

History of the English Language

A survey of the historical development of English language structure and usage in the Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English periods. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 331 Cr.3

Introduction to Linguistics

An introductory survey of the major subfields of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Some attention is given to language acquisition and language variation. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Spring.

ENG 332 Cr.3

Modern English Grammars: Analysis of Language

An examination of traditional, structural, and transformational-generative grammar with special emphasis on one method of analyzing and describing the English language. Investigation of phonology, morphology, and syntax. Some treatment given to the historical development of grammar and the concept of usage. (Not applicable to the English minor for students who have had ENG 330.) Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 333 Cr.3

Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies

An introductory course which presents theories of rhetoric and composition, emphasizing both conceptual knowledge and practical skills. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; at least sophomore standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 334 Cr.3

Language Study for Teachers

Designed for pre-service teachers, this course is intended to provide a theoretical base for structuring effective language education, for teaching writing and other language activities, and for understanding linguistic diversity. It will cover issues basic to understanding how language acquisition is a developmental process and how language functions in thinking, learning, and social interaction. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 335 Cr.3

Introduction to Professional Writing

Introduction to Professional Writing is designed as an introductory course for students who are interested in writing in professional settings. The course will include an introduction to various field definitions of professional writing, an overview of professional writing history and theory, provide space to study key concepts that are currently relevant in the field, and apply these histories and concepts to concrete documents that constitute study in the field of professional writing. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; sophomore standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 337 Cr.3

The Rhetorics of Style

A rhetorical study of various styles, this class systematically examines the social/cultural as well as the literary implications and impact styles have had in history. The class focuses on how understandings of style have changed throughout history and how different understandings shape strategies for interacting with audiences. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 338 Cr.3

Linguistics and Literature

Linguistic analysis of literary texts using methods in theoretical linguistics, sociolinguistics, and/or applied linguistics. No prior background in linguistics is necessary. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

EDM/ENG 340/540 Cr.3

Children's Literature

A basic course in literature for children of the primary grades through middle school. Special emphasis is given to picture books, easy books, storybooks, informational materials, folklore and poetry. Modern trends in the literature for this age level are highlighted. A short unit on censorship is included. No print material is used selectively. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses; junior or senior standing. (Cross-listed with EDM/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Occasionally.

EDM/ENG 341/541 Cr.3

Adolescent Literature

Survey of literature suitable for reading by adolescent boys and girls. The course is designed primarily for middle/secondary education students. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses; junior or senior standing. (Cross-listed with EDM/ENG; may only earn credit in one department.) Offered Occasionally.

ENG 342 Cr.3

The Essay

The development of the essay form and extensive reading of contemporary examples. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 343 Cr.3

Creative Nonfiction

An advanced course which emphasizes the personal essay, memoir, and other forms that blur the distinction between fiction and factual writing. While creative nonfiction may be informative, it may also be personal and lyrical. Students will study voice, prose style, and techniques of structuring content. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Every Third Semester.

ENG 344 Cr.3

The Novel

A course focusing on the history and development of the novel, from its putative origins in 18th-century England to its postmodern realizations on the world literature scene. Various theoretical explanations of the novel’s forms and social functions will be examined. The course will foster an understanding of the way narrative discourse functions as a mode of rhetoric, capable of persuading individual readers and even influencing historical trends. The course will also address the variety of formal approaches within the genre, from epistolary, historical and gothic novels to novels of manners, novels of social protest, and psychological and stream-of consciousness novels. Individual instructors may select examples from both the 'high' and 'low' forms of the genre, and may include English translations of foreign works. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Every Third Semester.

ENG 347 Cr.3

The Short Story

Reading the great stories of the world. Some emphasis upon modern techniques. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 348 Cr.4

Studies in Film Literature

An introduction to the study of film and film criticism, with some attention to the history of the medium and its relation to literary genres. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 349 Cr.4

Drama

An introduction to dramatic literature of the world. This course prepares the student to understand the elements of dramatic writing and staging of plays. Dramatic works will be selected from a variety of countries and historical periods to provide an overview of this genre, as well as the foundations needed for future study. Lect. 3, Lab 2. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 356 Cr.3

European Literature in Translation

A course focusing on classics of European literature. Individual instructors devise their own reading lists according to their own historical or thematic approaches, but most, if not all, of the readings will be translations from European languages other than English. This course aims to give students an understanding of various genres and traditions in European literature and to facilitate an enhancement of students’ critical and communicative skills. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Every Third Semester.

ENG 357 Cr.3

World Literature

A course designed to provide diversity education by studying world literatures from different regions and historical periods, ranging from ancient to modern Middle East, Africa, Asia, South Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Focus and content will vary with instructor. However, each instructor will cover at least two distinct world traditions. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 361 Cr.3

Old and Middle English Literature

An introduction to the study of Old and Middle English literature with attention to the development of genres and styles which shaped early English literary traditions. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 362 Cr.3

English Renaissance

Study of the major writers of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England. Emphasis on Spenser, Sidney, Jonson, Marlowe, Herrick, Herbert, Donne and others. Shakespeare’s non-dramatic work also will be included in the study of this period. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Every Third Semester.

ENG 363 Cr.3

Shakespeare I

Close study of several principal plays, chiefly from the early and middle parts of Shakespeare’s career. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 364 Cr.3

Shakespeare II

Close study of principal plays, chiefly plays coming after 'Hamlet.' Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 366 Cr.3

Restoration and 18th Century British Literature

Study of the principal works of the period 1660-1800, with emphasis on Dryden, Swift, Defoe, Pope, Fielding, Johnson, and Boswell. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Every Third Semester.

ENG 367 Cr.3

19th Century British Literature

Study of the finest poetry, fiction, drama and essays of the Romantic and Victorian periods of British literature, 1798-1901, with attention to the social, philosophical, and literary movements that engendered them. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 368 Cr.3

British Literature After 1900

A foundational course in the literature of the British Isles in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The course focuses on major British writers and literary developments, with emphasis on the ways this literature reflects changing British cultural identity and maintains continuity with the literary heritage out of which it develops. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 370 Cr.3

Early American Literature

Study of selected authors and works by and about the geographical region of North America which becomes the United States and bordering countries. Development of a literary audience and tradition with roots in, but separating from, English literature. Emphasis upon literature written in English, with selected works from Native traditions and colonists other than English. Most readings pre-date the U. S. Revolution. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Fall.

ENG 371 Cr.3

Nineteenth Century American Literature

A foundational study of important writers, movements, and themes in 19th century American literature. American Romanticism, the cultural forces surrounding the Civil War era, industrialization, immigration, the rise of urban culture, expansion West, and other similar contexts may be developed to explore the literary styles and genres of the developing American literary sensibility. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Spring.

ENG 372 Cr.3

American Literature After 1900

This course provides an introduction to some of the major 20th century writers and literary movements in the United States, in historical and cultural contexts. Historical currents and cultural movements will be primary emphases in text selection in order to familiarize students with literary developments such as Modernism and Post-modernism. Readings will be selected from major genres, including poetry, fiction, drama and autobiography. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Spring.

ENG 380 Cr.3

Literature of American Ethnic and Minority Cultures

Study of selected works representative of American ethnic and minority cultures, including American Indian, Chicano, and Jewish. Emphasis will vary according to the interests of students and the instructor. For the current content, consult the instructor or the department chairperson. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 381 Cr.3

American Indian Literature

A study of a broad range of American Indian literature, both traditional and contemporary, in cultural and historical contexts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 382 Cr.3

Latino Literature in English

Study of representative works in original English or translation by writers of Mexican American, Cuban American, Puerto Rican, and other Latino or Latin American origins, emphasizing the aesthetic dimensions of this literature as well as its historical roots and contemporary cultural contexts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Annually.

ENG 385 Cr.3

Women Authors

This course examines how women’s literature reflects the causes and nature of women’s places in society and their creation of alternative visions and strategies, with a focus on women’s negotiation of established traditions of authorship. Primary readings will span literary periods and genres. Authors may include Sappho, Marie de France, Katherine Phillips, Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Bronte, Phyllis Wheatley, Lillian Hellman, Djuna Barnes, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Angela Carter, Joyce Carol Oats, Toni Morrison, Zadie Smith. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Every Third Semester.

ENG 400/500 Cr.1-3

Workshop

Projects involving trends and issues in composition, language, or literature related to various professional uses of English, with a central topic to be announced before each workshop. No more than three credits are applicable to an English major or minor. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. Prerequisite: junior standing. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 403 Cr.1-3

Individual Projects

Directed individual studies under the supervision of a department faculty member. Repeatable for credit - maximum 3. Prerequisite: 12 credits and excellent grades in English courses. Consent of instructor. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 405/605 Cr.4

Teaching and Learning English in the Secondary School

This course will be integrated with a field experience. In the context of a real classroom, teacher candidates will learn how to plan for and assess student learning in English. With a focus on content knowledge, teacher candidates will plan a variety of meaningful learning experiences, assess student learning, and monitor and modify instruction to best support the individual learners in the classroom. The teacher candidate will design, enact, and assess activities that advance student understanding to more complex levels. Teacher candidates will gain experience in monitoring the obstacles and barriers that some students or groups of students face in school; candidates will learn how to design learning experiences to support all learners. Prerequisite: EDS 351; ENG 301. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 413 Cr.1-3

Writing Portfolio

A workshop course in which students assemble portfolios of their work, demonstrating their abilities as writers. English majors with an emphasis in rhetoric and writing and professional writing minors will be in the same section; however, writing minors, unless they elect the 3-credit option, will meet the class only one a week and will have a 1-credit work load. Prerequisite: senior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 415 Cr.3

Topics in Critical Theory

This course advances a reflective understanding of the processes of reading, writing, and interpretation of literary and cultural artefacts. Students will gain an understanding of concepts and methodologies drawn from one or more fields of the humanities as they pertain to a specific issue or area of critical theory. Content varies with instructor. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. No more than 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisites: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 416 Cr.3

Seminar in Advanced Fiction Writing

The writing of fiction under the guidance of an experienced fiction writer. Classes will operate on the workshop model, with as many individual conferences between students and teacher as possible. The class will also include information about literary magazines, ideas about publishing, and visits from other fiction writers. Prerequisite: ENG 305. Consent of instructor. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 417 Cr.3

Seminar in Advanced Poetry Writing

An advanced seminar in writing poetry with an experienced poet. Emphasis on the creative process, poetics, revision. Workshop format and individual tutorial meetings with poet. The class will also include information about literary magazines, ideas about publishing, and visits from other poets. Prerequisite: ENG 305. Consent of instructor. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 433 Cr.3

Introduction to Teaching Writing

Introduces students to histories, theories, and practices that will enable them to make effective choices as teachers of writing. Areas of study include a brief history of writing instruction in U.S. schools, including an overview of influential theories; the development and implementation of writing assignments; and theories and best practices for responding to student writing. Students engage these issues both as writers and as future teachers. This specific preparation to teach writing builds on students' disciplinary knowledge and more general courses in education theory and practice. Prerequisite: senior standing; English major and minor plans must have six credits in 300 level English courses. Offered Fall.

ENG 434 Cr.3

Chinese Discourse

This course compares and contrasts discourse in China to that in the West. It examines the culturally similar and crucially different ways of creating, elaborating, and presenting the writer’s ideas. Introducing the students to a culture at once similar to and different from their own, the course activates the students’ implicit knowledge of their own cultural/discursive heritages and supplements that knowledge when necessary. Readings for this class include ancient and modern Chinese philosophical essays, literary works, and writings on both Chinese calligraphy and paintings in relation to Chinese thinking. All texts used are in English. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 439 Cr.3

Topics in Linguistics

Study of linguistics topics of special interest. Topics reflect the research interests of instructors and new developments in the discipline. For current content, consult the instructor or the English Department. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. Only three credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; sophomore standing. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 445 Cr.3

Literature and Environmental Action

A study of literature of many genres written by nature and environmentalist writers, both traditional and contemporary, all serving as models for students’ essays and projects. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 446 Cr.3

Forms of Fiction

An investigation of traditional and contemporary narrative forms and some problems involved in writing within them. Students will be invited to write fictions of various kinds and find solutions to specific writing problems. Each student will present a seminar paper on aspects of narrative form in the work of a representative writer. Prerequisite: ENG 305. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 449 Cr.3

Forms of Poetry

An investigation of traditional and contemporary forms of poetry. Students will be asked to write poems in various forms. In addition, each student will present a seminar paper on aspects of form in the work of an established poet. Prerequisite: ENG 305. Offered Alternate Years.

ENG 450 Cr.2-6

English Internship

An internship of the English Department to offer its majors and minors opportunities to learn, on the job, how to apply language skills acquired from course work. Students can select jobs or field experiences related to writing and communication skills. These experiences could be with government agencies, business firms, and industry or community agencies locally or throughout the U.S. While many internships are remunerative, not all are necessarily so. Only jobs and experiences approved by an adviser in the English department and the English department chairperson are acceptable for credit. Students interning will be expected to make regular reports to their English adviser and to comply with any course arrangements that the adviser should deem suitable. Applies only to rhetoric/writing emphasis of the English major and to the professional writing minor. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. Prerequisite: junior standing; consent of adviser; a cumulative GPA of 2.50 required. Consent of instructor. Pass/Fail grading. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 452 Cr.3

Professional Writing Practicum

This course is designed as a practicum for the professional writing minor. Students will participate in a practicum and also in one course meeting a week. In addition to offering workplace writing experience, this course will cover issues of professionalism, legalities of writing for an organization, discussions of various participant experiences/learned knowledge, and it will end with the completion of a portfolio. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or ENG 112; junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

ENG 462 Cr.3

Seminar in British Literature

A seminar in British literature which involves advanced study of major British authors, works, genres and sub-genres, techniques and styles. The seminar may explore a particular literary/aesthetic development or idea, trace its roots in the past and examine its relevance to the present. With a change in emphasis, the seminar may center on several major movements and representative authors across time studied in light of historical contexts and/or from the analytic and aesthetic perspectives provided by contemporary developments in literary and critical theory. Students in the seminar are expected to engage in independent reading and research. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. No more than 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisite: ENG 301. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 463 Cr.3

Chaucer

Careful study of the Canterbury Tales and selected other poems. Some attention to language and pronunciation. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 464 Cr.3

Milton

Poetry and selected prose. Emphasis on Paradise Lost. Some attention given to Milton’s life and times. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 466 Cr.3

British Romanticism (1770-1830)

This course examines the works of many British writers, as they broke free from the tenets of the Enlightenment on their individual paths to self-expression. Romantic writers pursued several literary genres (essays, poems, novels, personal narrative, memoir) as texts to explore the concerns of all individuals in society. Works by Anna Barbauld, Mary Robinson, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Blake, Charlotte Smith, William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, Samuel Coleridge, Thomas Dequincey, Charles Lamb, John Keats, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, and others are studied. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 467 Cr.3

Victorian Poets

Browning, Tennyson, the Pre-Raphaelites, and others. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 469 Cr.3

Post-Colonial Anglophone Literatures

The course surveys important works (poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama, autobiography) of literature of Anglophone writers in a selection of the formerly colonized countries of the British Empire. The course examines literary texts within their historical contexts. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 470 Cr.3

Seminar in American Literature

A seminar in American literature, chosen from 17th century to the present, including American colonial culture and not strictly bounded by the borders of present-day United States; advanced study of author(s), works, genres and sub-genres, techniques and styles, theme or setting, and more. With change in emphasis and instructor, the seminar could present an historical development or an intense focus on a particular subject. Students are expected to engage in extensive independent reading and research, as well as presentation of research findings to class and moderating further discussion. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. No more than 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisite: ENG 301. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 471 Cr.3

American Romanticism

Selected authors and works of Revolutionary, Federal, and Pre-Civil War America, Romanticism describes a form and ideology continuing within the mainstream of American literature. Reading of 'classic' writers like Washington Irving, Louisa May Alcott, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edgar Allan Poe, and Nathaniel Hawthorne is complemented by writers dissenting from literary culture such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Margaret Fuller, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman, as well as writers of the southern and western states. Prerequisite: ENG 301. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 472 Cr.3

American Realism

Selected reading of authors and works of regions of the United States, to show Realism exists in variety as popular literature, primarily prose fiction and social commentary. Realism presumes diversity and multicultural literature, and its narrative technique requires readers to participate in creating and concluding 'meaning.' Prerequisite: ENG 301. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 476 Cr.3

Fiction and Nonfiction of Richard Wright

A study of Richard Wright’s fiction and nonfiction: illustrative of his versatility as a literary artist and of his aesthetic and intellectual leadership among African-American authors after the Harlem Renaissance. ENG 210 or 215 recommended. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 477 Cr.3

African American Essay and Short Story

An examination of the African American literary short form, specifically the essay and short story, across literary periods, includes such writers as D. Walker, F. Harper, M. Delany, C. Chesnutt, P. Dunbar, P. Hopkins, W. DuBois, L. Hughes, C. McKay, Z. Hurston, R. Wright, J. Baldwin, A. Baraka, E. Cleaver, S. Sanchez, and I. Reed. ENG 210 or 215 recommended. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 478 Cr.3

20th Century African American Novels

A study of significant novels written by preeminent twentieth-century African American writers, including DuBois, Toomer, Wright, Ellison, Baraka, and Morrison. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 481 Cr.3

Seminar in Literature and Culture

Advanced study of literature within a focused cultural context. Emphases might include literatures of particular ethnic cultures; transnational or regional literatures; literatures of identity; and cultural studies approaches to other literary topics. Focus will vary with instructor. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. No more than 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisite: ENG 301. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 482 Cr.3

Advanced Study of Women's Literature

This course offers advanced study of particular aspects of women’s aesthetic expression – the novel, poetry, drama, film, autobiography, and other genres are possible primary texts. Students will engage with advanced theoretical approaches through critical/contextual readings, while studying the gendered politics of producing and consuming women’s artistic work. Approaches might include cultural studies, psychoanalytic theory, socio-linguistics, global matriarchal traditions, new historicism, and feminist theory.  Focus will vary with instructor. Prerequisite: three credits of a 200 level ENG course. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 484 Cr.2

Capstone: Literary Studies

A required course for senior English majors with literature emphasis. Readings representative of contemporary approaches to literary studies. (Students will formulate and develop an appropriate issue relating the course readings to material encountered in a prior or concurrent 400-level course and carry out independent research on the topic, culminating in a long paper.) Students will build a research community through proposals, presentations and discussions of their work for the course. Prerequisite: Completion of all 300-level course requirements; concurrent enrollment in one course from major category IIIA designated as seminar or permission from department chair to substitute other 400-level course work for the research paper. Typically taken in the final semester of course work. Prerequisite: senior standing. Offered Spring.

ENG 494 Cr.1-3

Advanced Topics in Literature

Advanced study of literary topics of special interest. Topics reflect the research interests of instructors and new developments in the discipline. For current content, consult the instructor or the English Department. Only 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Consult English department for application to the English major or minor. ENG 301 required for English majors, recommended for all others. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 495 Cr.3

Advanced Study of Major Authors

Study beyond the survey or period level in the works of some English or American author or authors. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. Only three credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisite: 3 credits in 200 level English courses. Offered Occasionally.

ENG 497 Cr.3

Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing Studies

A seminar for advanced study in rhetoric and composition. Topics will vary according to the instructor. For the current content, consult instructor or department chair. Repeatable for credit - maximum 6. No more than 3 credits may be applied to an English major or minor. Prerequisite: ENG 333; at least junior standing. Offered Fall, Spring.

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